Local girls wrestler wins third state title

  • Allie Procter stands on top of the podium after winning her third straight Youth Georgia Wrestling State Championship title recently. Procter, 8, racked up three wins by pin versus her male opponents to secure her third straight championship title.
    Allie Procter stands on top of the podium after winning her third straight Youth Georgia Wrestling State Championship title recently. Procter, 8, racked up three wins by pin versus her male opponents to secure her third straight championship title.
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When Allie Procter was just five-years-old she made history when she became the first female wrestler to ever win the Youth Georgia State Championship title.
That was 2017.
A year later, Procter, who trains out of Cleveland MMA under the tutelage of her father Dustin Procter and her older brother Jack Procter, once again grappled her way to a Youth Georgia State Championship title; giving the then seven-year-old back-to-back State Championships.
Recently, at the ripe old age of eight, Procter once again dominated her opponents and made her mark in the youth wrestling world when she won her third straight State Championship title during the latest edition of Georgia Youth State Championships.
The Long Branch Elementary student was the lone female in her bracket during the State Championship tournament and racked up three wins by pin to become a three-time Youth State Champion.
“Her next goal is winning the Tulsa National boys division next season,” said her father. “And, she can’t wait to represent Lumpkin County schools when she gets to high school.”
Combined with her training at Cleveland MMA, Procter also trains at Teknique wrestling under Peter Yates and Tyler Askey as well as at Tree House under Sammy Roundtree.
Procter joined her brother Jack as a three-time Youth State Champion. The brother and sister duo both won State titles in 2017 and 2018, but Jack was unable to secure his fourth Youth State Championship this season.
Procter’s success on the mat over the past three seasons comes at a time when girls wrestling has become widely popular.
According to a USA Today report from August of last year, there are 21,735 girls wrestling at the high school level across the nation. That number is up by 27 percent from the previous year.
In addition, girls wrestling has been sanctioned in 21 states, which is up substantially from just five states five years ago.
The LCHS wrestling team fielded its first girls wrestling team this past season and picked up its first State placer in the girls program’s short history.
Procter, who has been a natural at creating mayhem on the mat the past three years, has not had the luxury of being able to wrestle against other girls; but has still displayed a dominance that can’t be ignored.
If the youngster sticks with the sport, she has an opportunity to be even more dominant as a Lady Indian wrestler when she reaches high school.
But, for now, Procter can revel in the fact that she has won three straight Youth State Championship titles versus some of the best male youth wrestlers the state of Georgia has had to offer during the course of her young wrestling career.
It’s something that can only be summed up as Procter Power.